Archive for January, 2010

30 January

How would you change Nikon’s D300S?

How would you change Nikon’s D300S?

Nikon’s D300S isn’t exactly tailor made for D300 owners, but for those waiting patiently to jump into the semi-pro DSLR game, it offers up a pretty delightful array of specs. Boasting SD and CF slots, a 720p movie mode and 12.3 megapixels of sharp shooting goodness, this here cam received overwhelmingly positive reviews late last year. Strategically positioned between the full-frame D700 and the lesser-specced D90, we’re sure the D300S found its way into quite a few hearts (and under quite a few trees) between then and now. If you’ve been firing off snaps with one of these for a few months now, we’re curious to know how you’d tweak things if the power were yours. Does the “S” really add enough to the D300 package to warrant the boost in price? How’s the image quality? Is the video mode a-okay for your purposes? Spill your heart out in comments below — we’re here to hold your hand if necessary.

How would you change Nikon’s D300S? originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 29 Jan 2010 22:52:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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CES 2007: Pioneer 24fps
CES 2007: Pioneer 24fps

28 January

Apple announces iWork for iPad

Apple announces iWork for iPad

Well, it looks like it’s not all just fun and games for Apple’s new iPad — the company has also just announced an edition of its iWork software suite for the device. That, of course, includes versions of Pages, Numbers and Keynote that have been “completely reimagined for iPad,” which will be available individually for $9.99 apiece, and are each basically what you’d expect from iPad versions of the desktop applications. It’s iWork you can touch, if you will.

Don’t miss our hands-on coverage!

Apple announces iWork for iPad originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 27 Jan 2010 14:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Logitech Wireless DJ
Logitech Wireless DJ
Apple s Tablet E-Book App Rips off Indie Dev s Creation
We love the iPhone book-reading app Classics, and apparently Apple does, too. The iPad tablet includes an app called iBooks, and its similarities to Classics are beyond the realm of coincidence. The UI is the same idea: a shelf of books that you can tap to choose a title. The pages emulate the look of a [...]

26 January

Timex readying GPS-equipped Ironman Global Trainer wristwatch

Timex readying GPS-equipped Ironman Global Trainer wristwatch

It’s been a white hot minute since we’ve seen a snazzy new timepiece from the labs at Timex, but it seems that the outfit will finally be dishing out a new GPS-laden watch a year after introducing the Expedition WS4. Set to debut next month, the Ironman Global Trainer with GPS is easily one of the slimmest, most not-ugly GPS watches we’ve ever seen. At a glance, you’d never know that such features as real-time speed, pace and distance data were included courtesy of the SiRFstarIII module tucked within, and you’ll also get 50 meters of water resistance, a customizable display to showcase four metrics at once and the ability to push performance reports out to your PC. The device will be compatible with Timex heart rate and bike sensors, not to mention any third-party power meters utilizing ANT+ wireless technology. Unfortunately, next month’s reveal will only let you know that it’ll ship this May to REI stores here in the States, while the rest of the world will have to wait until September to strap one on.

Continue reading Timex readying GPS-equipped Ironman Global Trainer wristwatch

Timex readying GPS-equipped Ironman Global Trainer wristwatch originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 25 Jan 2010 18:37:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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XtremeMac Luna iPod Clock Radio
XtremeMac Luna iPod Clock Radio
Poken Attempts to Replace Business Cards
Business cards work because most everyone has them. And if they don’t, it doesn’t matter: the transaction still works with a single card. Electronic business cards, like Poken, do not work. And they never will until everybody you want to swap details with is using the exact same application or widget. But that isn’t stopping Poken [...]
Mighty Pedal Power With Electric Help
Hybrid cycles have been around but they rarely take into consideration the elements. This makes their usage restrictive to fair weather. Slotting itself into the commuter vehicle bracket, the Emcycle tries to overcome this limitation by including a roof and Velcro-detachable side panels. Basically you can cocoon yourself and pedal …

24 January

Motorola asks ITC to ban BlackBerry imports

Motorola asks ITC to ban BlackBerry imports

It’s been a hell of a year for Motorola, but one thing’s stayed the same: the company still thinks RIM is ripping off some of its patents. At least that’s the sense we’re getting from a new complaint Moto’s just filed with the International Trade Commission alleging the BlackBerry crew is infringing five patents on “early-stage innovations” that range across WiFi, app management, UI, and power management. As per usual with ITC complaints, Motorola’s asking for a ban on RIM imports — we’d imagine a cross-complaint from RIM barring Motorola imports is coming soon. Also spotted: lawyers gleefully dancing in the streets dressed only in loinclothes made from money.

Motorola asks ITC to ban BlackBerry imports originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 22 Jan 2010 16:54:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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22 January

Viewsonic joins the Android Tablet fraternity with the VTablet 101

Viewsonic joins the Android Tablet fraternity with the VTablet 101

Viewsonic joins the Android Tablet fraternity with the VTablet 101

In a move that can only be described as caving in to peer pressure, Viewsonic has become the latest to prop up an Android-powered and keyboard-free device that probably won’t revolutionize the way you idly surf the web from your couch. Called the VTablet 101 it rocks a 1GHz ARM Cortex-A9 processor and NVIDIA Tegra graphics powering an 8.9-inch, 1024 x 800 touchscreen display. There’s 4GB of storage, WiFi, and Bluetooth, all in a reasonably attractive 3,000 Yuan ($440) price. Availability? Whenever hazing is over — assuming it survives.

Viewsonic joins the Android Tablet fraternity with the VTablet 101 originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 21 Jan 2010 08:26:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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19 January

Nokia N900 review

Nokia N900 review

Today, Nokia stands at a fascinating fork in the road. Let’s consider the facts: first, and most unavoidably, the company is the largest manufacturer of cellphones in the world by a truly sobering margin. At every end of the spectrum, in every market segment, Nokia is successfully pushing phones — from the highest of the high-end (see Vertu) to the lowest of the low (the ubiquitous 1100 series, which as far as we can tell, remains the best selling phone in history). The kind of stark dominance Nokia has built over its competition certainly isn’t toppled overnight, but what might be the company’s biggest asset has turned out to be its biggest problem, too: S60. In the past eight years, Nokia’s bread-and-butter smartphone platform has gone from a pioneer, to a staple, to an industry senior citizen while upstarts like Google and Apple (along with a born-again Palm) have come from practically zero to hijack much of the vast mindshare Espoo once enjoyed.

Of course, mindshare doesn’t pay the bills, but in a business dominated by fickle consumerism perhaps more than any other, mindshare foreshadows market share — it’s a leading indicator. Put simply, there are too many bright minds with brilliant ideas trying to get a piece of the wireless pie for even a goliath like Nokia to rest on its laurels for years on end. Yet, until just very recently, it seemed content to do just that, slipping out incremental tweaks to S60 on refined hardware while half-heartedly throwing a bone to the “the future is touch!” crowd by introducing S60 5th Edition alongside forgettable devices like the 5800 XpressMusic and N97. A victim of its own success, the company that had helped define the modern smartphone seemed either unwilling or unable to redefine it.

Not all is lost, though. As S60 has continued to pay the bills and produce modern, lustworthy devices like the E71 and E72, the open, Linux-based Maemo project has quietly been incubating in the company’s labs for over four years. What began as a geeky science experiment (a “hobby” in Steve Jobs parlance) on the Nokia 770 tablet back in 2005 matured through several iterations — even producing the first broadly-available WiMAX MID — until it finally made the inevitable leap into smartphone territory late last year with the announcement of the N900. On the surface, a migration to Maemo seems to make sense for Nokia’s long-term smartphone strategy; after all, it’s years younger than S60 and its ancestry, it’s visually attractive in all the ways S60 is not, and it was built with an open philosophy from the ground up, fostering a geeky, close-knit community of hackers and devs from day one. Thing is, Nokia’s been absolutely emphatic with us — Maemo’s intended for handheld computers (read: MIDs) with voice capability, while S60 continues to be the choice for purebred smartphones.

So, back to that fork in the road we’d mentioned. In one direction lies that current strategy Nokia is trumpeting — continue to refine S60 through future Symbian revisions (with the help of the Symbian Foundation) and keep pumping out pure-profit smartphones in the low to midrange while sprinkling the upper end of the market with a Maemo device here and there. In the long term, though, running two platforms threatens to dilute Nokia’s resources, cloud its focus, and confuse consumers, which leads us to the other direction in the fork: break clean from Symbian, develop Maemo into a refined, powerhouse smartphone platform, and push it throughout the range.

Our goal here is to test the N900, of course, but fundamentally, that’s the question we tried to keep in the backs of our minds for this review: could Maemo ultimately become the platform of Nokia’s future? Let’s dig in.

Continue reading Nokia N900 review

Nokia N900 review originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 19 Jan 2010 13:30:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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E3 2009: Warhammer 40K: Space Marine
E3 2009: Warhammer 40K: Space Marine
Apple Invitation Confirms Special Product Event Jan. 27
`1er
Saloon with No Drinks
This car is a wild missile for heck. It’s the 2017 Alfa Romeo Executive Fastback Saloon. What a mouthful! What an eyeful, you’re about to witness. Designer Jacob McMurry’s whipped up this magic machine to compliment the Alfa Romeo 8c Competizione in Alfa Romeo’s return to the North American market.* …

17 January

The Engadget Show tapes today with Erick Tseng of Google, our CES wrap-up… and we’re giving away a Nexus One!

The Engadget Show tapes today with Erick Tseng of Google, our CES wrap-up… and we’re giving away a Nexus One!

If you caught our coverage during CES 2010 (and you better have!), then you probably saw our quick sit-down with Senior Product Manager for Android, Erick Tseng. We had such a good time chatting with him and had so many other questions, we thought having him on the Engadget Show made lots of sense! So, today Erick will join us live on-stage to answer all of our burning questions (and yours too — shout them out in comments). We’ll also be doing a wrap-up of all the gear we saw at CES during our editors roundtable, we’ll be flying the Parrot A.R. Drone live and in-person, and we’re giving away a bunch of stuff to audience members (including CES swag, limited edition Engadget t-shirts… and a Nexus One courtesy of Google)! Oh, and we’ll have more chiptune goodness from our friend Glomag. Don’t miss this one, it’s going to be crazy.

The Show is sponsored by Sprint, and will take place at the Times Center, part of The New York Times Building in the heart of New York City at 41st St. between 7th and 8th Avenues (see map after the break). Tickets are — as always — free to anyone who would like to attend, but seating is limited, and tickets will be first come, first served… so get there early! Here’s all the info you need:

  • There is no admission fee — tickets are completely free
  • The event is all ages
  • Ticketing will begin at the Times Center at 2PM on Saturday, doors will open for seating at 4:30PM, and the show begins at 5PM
  • You cannot collect tickets for friends or family — anyone who would like to come must be present to get a ticket
  • Seating capacity in the Times Center is about 340, and once we’re full, we’re full
  • The venue is located at 41st St. between 7th and 8th Avenues in New York City (map after the break)
  • The show length is around an hour

If you’re a member of the media who wishes to attend, please contact us at: engadgetshowmedia [at] engadget [dot] com, and we’ll try to accommodate you. All other non-media questions can be sent to: engadgetshow [at] engadget [dot] com.

Subscribe to the Show:

[iTunes] Subscribe to the Show directly in iTunes (M4V).
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Continue reading The Engadget Show tapes today with Erick Tseng of Google, our CES wrap-up… and we’re giving away a Nexus One!

Filed under: Announcements

The Engadget Show tapes today with Erick Tseng of Google, our CES wrap-up… and we’re giving away a Nexus One! originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 16 Jan 2010 12:40:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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15 January

Line 6 announces Relay G30 system for guitar players who want to rock you sans tether (video)

Line 6 announces Relay G30 system for guitar players who want to rock you sans tether (video)

Line 6 announces Relay G30 system for guitar players who want to rock you sans tether (video)

We’ve been to concerts where the lead guitar player seemed more concerned about tripping over the wire running to his amp than actually putting on a good show, and that’s not cool. Line 6, creator of a series of rockin’ music gadgets in the past, is back to sever that tether without trampling your tune, man. It promises great sound over 100-feet, even able to replicate the frequency loss from different lengths of cable, and pledges to be “the most dependable wireless unit you’ve ever experienced.” It uses the 2.4GHz band (so hopefully nobody’s running a boosted 802.11b router nearby) and costs $420 — a bargain in this line of work. Don’t believe us? Trust Steve Stevens, who not only has a lovely last name but also rocked out with Billy Idol on Rebel Yell and said “there are systems that cost well over $3,000 that sound nowhere near as good.” Of course, if you’re a big-spender with tour funds to blow, Line 6 will happily sell you the 12-channel G50 and G90 models, which will set you back $560 and $840, respectively.

Continue reading Line 6 announces Relay G30 system for guitar players who want to rock you sans tether (video)

Line 6 announces Relay G30 system for guitar players who want to rock you sans tether (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 15 Jan 2010 08:58:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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AVA Direct Gaming PC
AVA Direct Gaming PC
DIY Lens Cap Saver Is Ingeniously Inventive
If you take photos with anything other than a little point and shoot, you will have, once in your life, lost a lens cap. Shortly afterwards, you would have found out that a simple plastic disk can be sold for almost $20 (or even $40). This stung, you will be particularly pleased with this little hack [...]
This Time It s A Sexy Watch
Besides it’s sexy looks, what I like most about the OXY Watch is that it s unisex. Routine specs like Time, Date, Calendar, and Alarm are included, but what makes it stand out is its gorgeous E-ink display. It s been conceived in several versions with stainless steel and colored leather strap …

13 January

Philips Cam, Muse and Ariaz mark a renaissance for the boring PMP

Philips Cam, Muse and Ariaz mark a renaissance for the boring PMP

This is soon enough to market that it’s hard to blame the iPod nano specifically for its appearance, but either way it seems that the Philips Cam is the newest member to the oh-so-small club of MP3 / camera combos. The new player is joined in its life of crime by the new Muse and Ariaz, which at last offer a higher-end aspect to Philips‘ long-lackluster PMP lineup. The Cam does up a 1.8-inch screen, 8GB of storage and a 2 megapixel camera for $100, but the Muse has a full 3.2-inches of touchscreen, 16GB of flash, SD expansion and HDMI out for a mere $50 more. The Ariaz finds a simpler calling, with a 2.4-inch LCD, HDMI, 8GB and an $80 tag. We’ll have to play with these to see if they’re worth taking home from Walmart, but we’re glad to see Philips is trying to stay in the game — we can’t all be lucky enough to be Zune HD owners.

Philips Cam, Muse and Ariaz mark a renaissance for the boring PMP originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 13 Jan 2010 16:32:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Samsung Press Conference Part 3 CES 2009
Samsung Press Conference Part 3 CES 2009
Hands-On With Panasonic s Leica-Lite GF1
The Lumix GF1 is Panasonic’s answer to the Olympus Pen, and is the second “rangefinder” style Micro Four Thirds camera on the market. It blows away both the EP-1 Pen and also the new EP-2 Pen, and is — amazingly — good enough to replace all but the best of entry-level DSLRs. The camera has been [...]

11 January

T-Mobile makes mention of 3G issues with Nexus One, hopes to have ‘more information’ soon

T-Mobile makes mention of 3G issues with Nexus One, hopes to have ‘more information’ soon
There’s no fix yet, but Nexus One users are getting a solid first step this week now that T-Mobile is officially investigating the 3G / EDGE fluctuation issues that folks have been reporting. A posting over on T-Mob’s official support forums is now asking for users with verifiable problems to report a few key stats including their location, the nature of the problem (no 3G or 3G / EDGE switching), and whether they’ve got another AWS 3G phone handy that’s performing better. The company says that it hopes “to have more information for you soon,” so, you know, keep that box handy just in case this puppy needs to get exchanged Nokia 5800-style.

T-Mobile makes mention of 3G issues with Nexus One, hopes to have ‘more information’ soon originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 11 Jan 2010 13:45:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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CES 2009: Skullcandy Stack Headphones
CES 2009: Skullcandy Stack Headphones
Panasonic SD Card Worth 8-Times Its Weight in Gold
Some say that memories are priceless. This may be true, but memory has a price, and it’s a high one. Panasonic’s new anxiety-inducing, eggs-in-one-basket SDXC card packs 64GB into a sliver the size of a toenail. The price is an equally disturbing $600. John Nack and John Peterson over at Adobe decided to see just how [...]